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Center for Collegiate 
Mental Health 

(CCMH) 

2015 ANNUAL REPORT 



BRINGING SCIENCE AND PRACTICE 

Together. 


ip PennState 



Acknowledgements 

The 2015 Annual Report was made possible by: 

>- Collaborative efforts of over 340 university and 
college counseling centers 

>- Association for University and College Counseling 
Center Directors (AUCCCD) 

>- Titanium Software, Inc. 

>- van Ameringen Foundation 
>- The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention 
(AFSP) 

>- Penn State University’s Student Affairs 


CCMH Research Team at 
Penn State University 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR: 

Ben Locke, Ph.D. — Associate Director of Clinical Services, 
Counseling and Psychological Services 

PROJECT MANAGER: 

Ashley Stauffer, M.S. 

COUNSELING AND 
PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES: 

Aki Kawamoto, Ph.D. — Staff Psychologist & 

Assessment Coordinator 

Andres Perez Rojas, Ph.D. — Post Doctoral Fellow 
Allison Lockard, M.A. — Psychology Intern 

Brett Scofield, Ph.D.— Assistant Director, Research 
and Technology 

Desiree Howell, Ph.D. — Staff Psychologist 
Kristin Hogan, Psy.D. — Post Doctoral Fellow 
Paul Carswell, M.A., Ed.S, LPC — Staff Clinician 

Shannan Smith-Janik, Ph.D. — Staff Psychologist & 
Practicum Coordinator 

Ted Bartholomew, M.A. — Psychology Intern 




DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL 
PSYCHOLOGY, COUNSELING, AND 
SPECIAL EDUCATION: 

Professors of Counseling Psychology 

Allison Flemming, Ph.D. 

Carlos Zalaquett, Ph.D. 

Diandra Prescod, Ph.D. 

Kathleen Bieschke, Ph.D. 

Katie Kostohryz, Ph.D. 

Jeffrey A. Hayes, Ph.D. 

SeriaShia Chatters, Ph.D. 

Wendy Coduti, Ph.D. 


DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY: 
Professor of Clinical Psychology 

Louis G. Castonguay, Ph.D. 

Doctoral Students in Clinical Psychology 

Dever Carney, B.A. 

Rebecca Janis, B.S. 

Soo JeongYoun, M.S. 

Henry Xiao, B.A. 

STUDENT AFFAIRS RESEARCH 
AND ASSESSMENT: 

Adam Christensen, Ph.D. — Director 
Megan Nyce, B.A. — Graduate Assistant 
Ya-Chi Hung, M.A. — Graduate Assistant 

OFFICE OF PLANNING AND 
INSTITUTIONAL ASSESSMENT: 
Alexander Yin, Ph.D. — Senior Planning and 
Research Associate 


CCMH Advisory Board Members (2015) 

Rob Davies, Ph.D. — Assistant Director, University of 
Utah Counseling Center 

Dennis Heitzmann, Ph.D. — (ex-officio) — Director, 
Counseling and Psychological Services, Penn State 
University 

Nathaniel Hopkins, Ph.D. — Staff Psychologist, 
Coordinator for Information and Systems, University of 
Kentucky Counseling Center 

Shelly Lear, Ph.D. — Director of Counseling and Student 
Wellness, Hobart and William Smith Colleges 

Brian Mistier, Ph.D. — Associate Dean of Students and 
Director of Health Services, Ringling College of Art and 
Design 

Ariella Softer, Ph.D. — Intake Coordinator, Counseling 
and Wellness Services, Hunter College 

Curtis Wiseley, Psy.D. — Director of Counseling Services, 
School of Professional Counseling, Lindsey Wilson 
College 

Cynthia Cook, Ph.D. — Executive Director of Counseling, 
Health, and Career Services, University of Houston- Clear 
Lake 

Michelle Cooper, Ph.D. — Clinical Director, Counseling 
and Psychological Services, Western Carolina University 

Carolyn Heitzmann Ruhf, Ph.D. — Staff Psychologist, 
University of Southern California Student Counseling 
Services 

David Reetz, Ph.D. (AUCCCD liaison) — Director, Aurora 
University Counseling Services 

Ryan Weatherford, Ph.D. — Professor and Staff 
Psychologist, Counseling and Psychological Services, 

West Chester University 

NEW MEMBERS IN 2014: 

Ellie Olson, Ph.D. — Director of Counseling Services, 
Simpson College 

John Achter, Ph.D. — Director of Counseling and EAP, 
University of Wisconsin, Stout 

Richard Tyler-Walker, Ph.D. — Assistant Director/Training 
Director, North Carolina State University 


Recommended Citation 

Center for Collegiate Mental Health. 
(2016, January). 2015 Annual Report 
(Publication No. STA 15-108). 


This publication is available in alternative media on request. Penn State is an equal 
opportunity, affirmative action employer, and is committed to providing employment 
opportunities to all qualified applicants without regard to race, color, religion, age, sex, 
sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability or protected veteran status. 
U.Ed. STA 15-108 MPC1 36556 



Table of Contents 

1 CCMH: Bringing Science and Practice Together — 

Introduction and Orientation 

1 Standardized Data Set (SDS) and the Counseling Center Assessment 
of Psychological Symptoms (CCAPS) 

1 CCMH Data Navigator 

2 2015 Report Highlights 

3 Discussion of 2015 Highlights 

4 2014-2015 Publications and Presentations 

5 Mental Health Trends 

6 CCAPSTrends 

7 Changes in Counseling Center Utilization from 2009-2010 to 2014-2015 
9 Counseling Center Resource Utilization by Students 

9 Average Number of Attended Individual Sessions 
9 Impact of "Threat to Self" History on Appointment Usage 
10 Standardized Data Set (SDS) 

10 Clinician Index of Client Concerns (CLICC) 

11 CLICC - "Check all that apply" 

12 CLICC - "Top-most concern" 

13 Client Demographic Information 

18 Mental Health History Items 

30 Provider Data 

31 Center Information 

32 Institutional Data 

32 CCMH Member Institutions 




CCMH: Bringing Science and Practice Together 


INTRODUCTION AND ORIENTATION 

College student mental health received widespread 
attention during the 2014-2015 academic year with in- 
depth commentary appearing in numerous major media 
outlets. These articles examined college student mental 
health from various perspectives including the experiences 
of students and parents, counseling centers, the rise of 
anxiety in higher education, suicide prevention, and even 
the role of mental health in campus tragedies. Each of 
these articles raised a predictable set of questions: “Is the 
demand for mental health services really growing?”, “Are 
students really more distressed?”, “How are students more 
distressed?”, and of course, “Why?” 

While it can be tempting to pursue quick answers that 
complement a headline, the frank reality is that the mental 
health of our college students is multi-faceted, multi- 
modal, and complexly embedded in overlapping macro/ 
micro cultures; there is no simple answer. However, this 
year’s report, summarizing five years of high quality and 
generalizable trend data, sheds some much needed light on 
these complex questions and offers helpful information for 
administrators, policy-makers, clinicians, and researchers 
to consider at each of their unique institutions. 

This 2015 Annual Report summarizes data contributed 
to CCMH during the 2014-2015 academic year, closing 
on June 30, 2015. De-identified data were contributed 
by 139 college and university counseling centers, 
describing 100,736 unique college students seeking mental 
health treatment, 2,770 clinicians, and over 770,000 
appointments. 

The following are critical to understand when reading 
this report: 

1) This report describes college students receiving 
mental health services, NOT the general college 
student population. 

2) This report is not a survey. The data summarized 
herein is gathered during routine clinical practice at 
participating counseling centers, is de-identified, and 
then contributed to CCMH. 

3) The number of clients will vary by question because 
not all questions are asked at each center. 

4) Counseling center members, that contributed data for 
this report, received IRB approval at their institution. 


Standardized Data Set (SDS) and the 
Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological 
Symptoms (CCAPS) 

The data within this report is made possible by 
standardized data embedded within electronic medical 
records (EMR). The SDS is a large collection of 
standardized questions, answers, and instruments that 
CCMH makes available to participating counseling centers 
through EMR vendors. The SDS has been collaboratively 
designed over time by hundreds of counseling centers 
and the CCMH Advisory Board, starting in 2006. 

Use of the SDS enables counseling centers to gather 
standardized data during routine clinical practice, which 
can then be contributed to CCMH for this annual report. 
The most up-to-date SDS definitions are available at 
https://ccmh.psu.edu. 

The CCAPS is a standardized multi-dimensional 
psychometric instrument designed by/for counseling 
centers that is used for initial assessment and outcome 
monitoring. The 2015 CCAPS was released in June 2015 
with a new normative sample of more than 230,000 
students in treatment, a graphical layout, average dose/ 
response curves, clinician alerts, and much more. The 
CCAPS is available to counseling centers via four 
electronic medical record (EMR) systems including 
Titanium Schedule, Medicat, Point and Click, and 
Pyramed. In addition, the 2015 CCAPS is now available 
via a dedicated web-interface for both counseling centers 
that do not use an EMR and those that utilize an 
unsupported EMR. Please email ccmh@psu.edu for more 
information about the CCAPS, the CCAPS User Manual, 
or online training webinars. 

Accessing CCMH Data - 
The New CCMH Data Navigator 

For many years, a key goal of CCMH has been to give 
data back, in an actionable form, to counseling center 
members, higher education, and the general public. After 
many years of exploring different strategies that did not 
work, this goal was finally realized in the fall of 2015 with 
the brand new CCMH Data Navigator. (We are thankful 
to the Healthy Minds Study at the University of Michigan 
for their help and support in this project!) 

This year’s data, along with prior years, are now available 
to members and the general public online via the CCMH 
Data Navigator. Participating centers will be able to track 
their data over time and benchmark with other schools. In 
addition, CCMH is now making aggregate data available 
to the general public for the purpose of informing the 


1 


national discussion on college student mental health with 
high-quality generalizable data about students seeking 
mental health services. The CCMH Data Navigator 
allows the user to examine specific data points over time 
and to examine any given data point via a wide range of 
demographic variables. 

The CCMH Data Navigator can be found online here: 
http://ccmh.psu.edu/data/ 

2015 Report Highlights 

The 2015 Annual Report represents a decade of work for 
CCMH and the hundreds of participating counseling 
centers. In addition to describing more than 100,000 
college students seeking mental health services in 2014- 
2015, this year’s report also summarizes mental health 
trends across five full academic years (2010-201 1 through 
2014-2015). The following list highlights a number of the 
key findings in this year’s report. Please note that these 
findings refer to students seen in counseling centers, unless 
otherwise specified: 

1. A supplemental survey of CCMH members in 2015 
examined change in institutional enrollment and 
counseling center utilization over the last 6 years 
(2009-2010 through 2014-2015). Data from 93 
institutions showed, on average, the growth in number 
of students seeking services at counseling centers 
(+29.6%) was more than 5x the rate of institutional 
enrollment (+5.6%). Further, the growth in counseling 
center appointments (+38.4) is more than 7x the rate 
of institutional enrollment, (see page 7) 

2. The lifetime prevalence rates for prior mental health 
treatment have remained quite stable over the past 
five years including prior counseling (1 in 2), prior 
psychiatric medications (1 in 3), and prior psychiatric 
hospitalizations (1 in 10). Although these rates are 
high and should be of concern, the stability of these 
indices suggest that the rates of prior treatment are not 
changing and therefore unlikely to be the cause of the 
increased demand for services, (see page 5) 

3. Some types of self-reported distress (measured by 
the CCAPS) and mental health history variables 
(measured by the SDS) have remained very stable 
or even decreased slightly over the last five years, 
including CCAPS Subscale Scores on Academic 
Distress, Eating Concerns, Hostility (i.e., frustration), 
Substance Abuse, Family Distress, as well as SDS 
variables of prior treatment for drugs and alcohol and 
lifetime prevalence rates of harassment/sexual assault, 
(see page 6 for CCAPS and page 5 for SDS) 


4. Three types of self-reported distress have demonstrated 
slow but consistent growth over the past five years 
including: Depression, Anxiety, and Social Anxiety. 

In comparison to areas of distress that are flat or 
decreasing, this finding indicates that college students 
are reporting increasing levels of distress, and that these 
specific areas parallel the most common presenting 
concerns, Depression and Anxiety, as determined by 
clinicians, (see page 6) 

5. The lifetime prevalence rate for non-suicidal self-injury 
(NSSI) has increased slowly but steadily over the last 
five years from 21.8% to 25.0% (see page 5). While 
NSSI does not always represent imminent threat to 
self, it is usually evidence of poor coping or difficulty 
with coping and can be disruptive to the campus 
community. 

6. The lifetime prevalence rate for serious suicidal 
ideation (i.e., “I have seriously considered suicide”) 
has increased substantially over the last 5 years from 
23.8% to more than 32.9% (see page 5). This is a 
considerable change, especially in the context of other 
indices that are decreasing, flat, or increasing only 
slightly. 

7. Among those who endorsed a history of serious 
suicidal ideation, the frequency of serious suicidal 
ideation occurrence within the last month also 
increased annually over the last three years from 
7.2%in 2013 to 8.3% (this item was new in 2012). 

(see page 5) 

8. The lifetime prevalence rate for “attempted suicide” 
has remained relatively flat for the last five years. 

(see page 5) 

9. The lifetime prevalence rates for (a) thoughts of 
harming others and (b) causing serious harm to others 
have remained low and stable over 5 years, (see page 5) 

1 0. Students who endorse mental health histories 
involving “threat to self” thoughts and behaviors 
(NSSI, serious suicidal ideation, or suicide attempts) 
use an average of 27% more appointments than 
students who do not. (see page 9) 

1 1 . 20% of students seen in counseling centers utilize 
more than 50% of all appointments, (see page 9) 


2 



Discussion of 2015 Highlights 

Hundreds of university and college counseling centers have 
collaborated with CCMH over the last decade to build 
a practice-research-network (PRN) focused on the goal 
of accurately describing trends in college student mental 
health using high quality and representative data. The 
2015 Annual Report realizes this ambitious goal with five- 
year trend data representing hundreds of institutions. The 
goal of this section is to explore and interpret the complex 
data resulting from these efforts. 

First, the highlighted findings make it clear that many 
aspects of college student mental health have actually 
been stable over the past five years. For example, rates 
of prior mental health treatment, some types of mental 
health distress reported by students, and the frequency 
with which students report thoughts of hurting others (or 
having hurt another) have all remained essentially flat. 
These same students have expressed slightly increasing 
levels of depression and anxiety (see CCAPS Trends), 
but the increases are small. The relative stability of these 
variables does not decrease their significance (e.g., 10% of 
students in counseling centers report a prior psychiatric 
hospitalization), but it does help to clarify that some 
aspects of college student mental health are not “getting 
worse.” 

In contrast, a sub-group of mental health variables have 
demonstrated worrisome increases over the last five 
years, making it clear that some specific aspects of college 
student’s mental health are changing and in need of 
focused consideration. For example, the average demand 
for counseling center services grew at least 5x faster than 
average institutional enrollment. In addition, the last 
five years of data suggest that students seeking services 
are more likely to endorse “threat to self” indicators 
such as serious suicidal thoughts and self-injurious 
behaviors, both of which increase the urgency for everyone 
involved. Finally, this year’s report finds that the growing 
percentage of students with “threat to self” indicators are 
provided with nearly 30% more services. Collectively, 


these three trends represent a perfect storm for college 
counseling centers. Thus many will now ask, “Why is this 
happening?” 

Theories have abounded in recent years to explain the 
growth of mental health concerns in college ranging from 
parenting styles to lack of resilience or coping skills. While 
all of these theories may have value, it is important to 
test theories with data. An additional theory, which can 
be examined with our data, is that a myriad of large-scale 
intervention efforts and institutional changes have had a 
cumulative and measurable impact in higher education 
over the last ten years. Indeed, this theory would contend 
that some of the five-year trends observed in this year’s 
report are intended outcomes. 

While there is no clear starting point, the Garrett Lee 
Smith Memorial Act (GLSMA) was signed into law 
in 2004 by the US Congress to reduce the incidence 
of suicide among college students. Subsequent to 
this event, tens of millions of dollars were invested 
in higher education by a wide variety of funders with 
goals including: suicide prevention, educating campus 
communities about mental health, reducing stigma, 
increasing help seeking, and improving the ability of 
community members (faculty, staff, and students) to 
identify students-at-risk and refer them for treatment. 
During this same period, annual surveys of college 
student’s mental health have become commonplace, 
potentially impacting student’s knowledge, attitudes, and 
behavior. Finally, institutionally coordinated behavioral- 
threat and care-teams have become the accepted gold 
standard of practice in higher education. The common 
goal of these efforts is to improve our collective ability 
to identify students-at-risk in order to refer them to 
treatment. If these collective efforts have been cumulatively 
successful, they should hypothetically produce a 
measurable increase in both the overall demand for mental 
health services and the percentage of students in treatment 
who represent risk. While there are many findings in 
the 2015 report, and many potential interpretations, the 


3 



data support this hypothesis rather well. For example, 
the frequency that students in treatment report having 
“seriously considered suicide” has increased by 38% in 
the last five years (relative increase). This change stands 
out in a field of trends that are generally flat or changing 
only slightly. It also seems more plausible that this trend 
resulted from a decade of interventions focused on this 
very outcome rather than a sudden national decline in 
student’s resilience. Given the apparent alignment between 
theory, intervention, and data, it seems reasonable to pause 
and review our interpretation of, and response to, mental 
health concerns in higher education. 

The findings in this year’s report strongly suggest that a 
decade of efforts, aimed at building communities that 
are responsive to the mental health concerns of at-risk 
students, have been successful and that counseling 
centers are now bearing a heavy burden from this success. 
Consequently, it is now imperative that institutions of 
higher education take action to accommodate the increase 
in demand for mental health services that we have all 
worked so hard to create. 

2014-2015 Publications and Presentations 

Since our founding in 2004, CCMH has operated as a 
practice-research network (PRN) conducting practice- 
oriented research (POR) by actively integrating the 
interests of practitioners, researchers, and administrators 
to achieve a wide variety of goals that are beneficial to the 
field. 

Over the past year, CCMH has been specifically addressing 
the scientist-practitioner gap through client-focused 
research, which is one approach within POR. Client- 
focused research promotes the careful assessment and 
tracking of client’s progress in treatment, and also provides 
empirically validated feedback to therapists to augment 
their clinical practice. The 2015 CCAPS profile report 
exemplifies this type of practice oriented research. 

CCMH also continues to conduct research that is 
empirically rigorous and clinically valid. For example, Xiao 
et al. (2015) recently examined therapist differences in 
attendance and drop out rates. Janis et al. (2015) explored 
different methods for calculating the average change 
curve and feedback provision that were included in the 
2015 CCAPS profile report. Youn et al. (2015) sought to 
understand therapist differences in clients’ outcome across 
the different CCAPS subscales. 

CCMH is excited to share the following POR publications 
and presentations from the past academic year: 

• Castonguay, L. G., & Muran, J. C. (2015). Fostering 
collaboration between researchers and clinicians 
through building practice-oriented research: An 
introduction. Psychotherapy Research, 25, 1-5. 


• Castonguay, L. G., Youn, S., Xiao, H., Muran, J. C., 
& Barber, J. P. (2015). Building clinicians-researchers 
partnerships: Lessons from diverse natural settings 
and practice-oriented initiatives. Psychotherapy 
Research, 25(1), 166-184. 

• Hayes, J. A., McAleavey, A. A., Castonguay, L. G., & 
Locke, B. D. (in press). Psychotherapist effects with 
White and racial/ethnic minority clients: First, the 
good news. Journal of Counseling Psychology. 

• Janis, R., Youn, S., Xiao, H., Castonguay, L. G., 
Hayes, J. A., & Locke, B. D. (2015, June). 
Comparison of expected treatment response and 
nearest neighbor methods for generating expected 
recovery curves. Paper presented as part of a panel at 
the 2015 Society for Psychotherapy Research (SPR), 
46th International meeting, Philadelphia, PA. 

• McAleavey, A. A., Lockard, A. J., Castonguay, 

L. G., Hayes, J. A., & Locke, B. D. (2015). Building 
a practice-research network: Obstacles faced and 
lessons learned at the Center for Collegiate Mental 
Health. Psychotherapy Research, 25, 134-151. 

• Nordberg, S. S., Castonguay, L. G., McAleavey, 

A. A., Locke, B. D., & Hayes, J. A. (Accepted for 
publication). Enhancing feedback for clinical use: 
Creating and evaluating profiles of clients seeking 
counseling. Journal of Counseling Psychology 

• Ratanasiripong, P., Wang, C. D. C., Ratanasiripong, 
N., Hayes, J. A., Kaewboonchoo, O., & Kathalae, 

D. (2015). Development and cross-cultural 
validation of the Counseling Center Assessment 

of Psychological Symptoms — Thai version. 

The Counseling Psychologist, 43, 248-271. 

• Xiao, H., Youn, S., Janis, R., Hayes, J. A., 
Castonguay, L. G., & Locke, B. D. (2015, June). 

The unpredictable client: Therapist differences 
in client early attendance and dropout. Paper 
presented as part of a panel at the 2015 Society for 
Psychotherapy Research (SPR), 46th International 
meeting, Philadelphia, PA. 

• Youn, S., Castonguay, L. G., Xiao, H., Janis, R., 
McAleavey, A. A., Lockard, A. J., Locke, B. D., 

& Hayes, J. A. (2015). The Counseling Center 
Assessment of Psychological Symptoms (CCAPS): 
Merging clinical practice, training and research. 
Psychotherapy 

• Youn, S., Xiao, H., Janis, R., Castonguay, L. G., 
Hayes, J. A., & Locke, B. D. (2015, June). Therapist 
effects in naturalistic settings. Paper presented as 
part of a panel at the 2015 Society for Psychotherapy 
Research (SPR), 46th International meeting, 
Philadelphia, PA. 


4 


Mental Health Trends 


To examine five-year mental health trends among college students in treatment, the following items were simplified to 
“Yes” or “No”, providing the life-time prevalence of each item. 

(NOTE: Some items have changed slightly over time. Items with an asterisk (*) had an answer format change between 2011-2012 and 2012-2013.) 


Data Sets 


Attended counseling for Taken a medication for 

mental health concerns mental health concerns 


Year 

# of 

Institutions 

# of 
Clients 

2010-2011 

97 

82,611 

2011-2012 

120 

97,012 

2012-2013 

132 

95,109 

2013-2014 

140 

101,027 

2014-2015 

139 

100,736 




Purposely injured yourself 
without suicidal intent 
(e.g., cutting, hitting, 
burning, hair pulling, etc.)* 



Seriously considered 
attempting suicide* 



Seriously considered 
attempting suicide 
(Last time = within the last 
month or sooner): 



NOTE: New question in 2012. 


Considered seriously 
hurting another person* 


Intentionally caused serious 
injury to another person * 


Had unwanted sexual 
contact(s) or experience(s)* 





Been hospitalized for 
mental health concerns* 


10.3% 10.2% 

10.2% 

7.8% 


_ 7.0% 




_ o o 5 

o 

o — * to CO 

■Pa. 

fO ro to to 

to 

- o o o o 

O 

— 1 ISO to ■£» 

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Made a suicide attempt* 



Experienced harassing, 
controlling, and/or abusive 
behavior from another 
person (e.g., friend, family 
member, partner, authority 
figure, etc.)* 



Experienced a traumatic 
event that caused you 
to feel intense fear, 
helplessness, or horror* 



Felt the need to reduce your 
alcohol or drug use* 



Others have expressed 
concern about your alcohol 
or drug use* 



Received treatment for 
alcohol or drug use* 



5 


CCAPS Trends 

The Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms (CCAPS) is a multi-dimensional assessment and outcome 
monitoring instrument used by members of CCMH. The 2015 CCAPS was released in June of 2015 and includes two 
versions: the CCAPS-62 (62 items, 8 subscales) and the CCAPS-34 (34 items, 7 subscales). Both the CCAPS-62 and 
CCAPS-34 also include the Distress Index, an overall measure of a client’s general psychological distress using items from 
several CCAPS subscales. Students respond to the items on a 5-point likert scale from 0 (Not at all like me) to 4 (Extremely 
like me) . 

To explore whether student self-reported distress is changing over time, we examined the average raw subscale scores over 
the last five years for both the CCAPS-62 and the CCAPS-34. The charts below indicate that the average raw scores have 
gradually increased for Depression, Generalized Anxiety, and Social Anxiety. On the other hand, flat or decreasing raw scores 
are noted for Academic Distress, Eating Concerns, Hostility (i.e., frustration), Substance/ Alcohol Use, and Family Distress. 

These findings indicate that not all areas of student distress are worsening and some may even be decreasing. However, 
Depression, Generalized Anxiety, and Social Anxiety are showing slight but consistent increases. These increases are 
consistent with the most common presenting concerns in counseling centers, (see CLICC-Check All That Apply, page 1 1) 


2010-2011 


2011-2012 


2012-2013 


2013-2014 


2014-2015 


CCAPS-62 Trends: Average Raw Subscale Scores (2010 to 2015 ) 


J U I I I I I I 


Depression Generalized Social Academic Eating Hostility Substance Family 

Anxiety Anxiety Distress Concerns Use Distress 


2010-2011 


2011-2012 


2012-2013 


2013-2014 


2014-2015 


CCAPS-34 Trends: Average Raw Subscale Score (2010 to 2015) 


J 1 I L 


J L 


Depression Generalized Social Academic Eating Hostility Alcohol Distress 

Anxiety Anxiety Distress Concerns Use Index 


6 





Changes in Counseling Center Utilization from 
2009-2010 to 2014-2015 

It is widely believed that the demand for mental health services in college is growing at an 
unprecedented pace. This belief is based on widespread anecdotal reports from clinicians, 
student surveys, surveys of counseling center directors, and a handful of data-driven reports 
from individual counseling centers. 

To examine this question systematically from a national perspective, CCMH conducted 
a supplemental membership survey in November 2015 that asked counseling centers to 
provide the following specific data points over the last five academic years between 2009- 
2010 and 2014-2015: (1) total institutional enrollment during the Fall semester, (2) total 
number of students seeking services at the counseling center, and (3) the total number of 
attended appointments in the counseling center. Ninety-three CCMH members (out of a 
total of 120 responses) were able to provide complete data for both 2009-2010 and 2014- 
2015 academic years. These 93 cases were used for the following five-year trend analysis. 

The number of enrolled students, students seeking counseling services, and attended 
appointments were averaged across institutions, and the percentage of change was 
calculated for each data point. Results indicated that, on average over the last 5 years, 
institutional enrollment grew by 5.6%, the number of students seeking services increased 
by 29.6%, and the number of attended appointments increased by 38.4%. In other words, 
the number of students treated by counseling centers grew at more than 5x the rate of 
institutional enrollment and the number of attended appointments grew at more than 7x 
the pace of institutional enrollment. To check for the influence of outliers (schools with 
dramatic and unusual growth or loss), the three top/bottom schools with greatest growth/ 
greatest loss were removed and analyses were re-run. Results shifted only slightly, indicating 
that the results were not dramatically skewed by individual schools with dramatic and 
unusual change. Descriptive statistics (pg. 8) indicate a wide range of sizes, utilization rates, 
and change rates. 


Change Rates between 2009-2010 and 2014-2015 for Counseling Centers and Institutions (N=93) 



Institutional Students Appointments 

Enrollment Served Attended 


7 



Descriptive Statistics Table (N=93) 



Minimum 

Maximum 

Mean 

Std. 

Deviation 

Institutional Enrollment 

946 

60,821 

19,506.4 

13,384.1 

Students Served 

222 

4,525 

1,529.9 

1,099.3 

Appointments Attended 

411 

30,656 

7,716.5 

6,053.6 

2014 Utilization 

(% of student body served in the 
counseling center) 

1.3% 

26.3% 

9.5% 

4.9% 

Change in Institutional Enrollment 

-22.2% 

37.1% 

5.9% 

10.4% 

Change in Students Served 

-15.9% 

210.1% 

31.8% 

31.4% 

Change in Appointments Attended 

-30.9% 

363.5% 

44.3% 

46.3% 

Change in Utilization 

-20.4% 

212.2% 

24.9% 

29.3% 


These results indicate that the demand for counseling center services is dramatically 
outpacing the growth of institutional enrollment. While this survey did not examine 
staffing level changes over time, we know that it is rare for counseling centers to experience 
a 30% increase in staffing in just five years, and that most counseling centers did not meet 
the IACS-recommended paid staff-to-student ratios in 2009 (see the 2010 AUCCCD 
Survey). A number of conclusions can be drawn from these survey results: 

1) A hypothetical average counseling center that met IACS recommended staff-to-student 
ratios in 2009, and also received consistent annual funding increases tied to enrollment 
growth based on a known historical utilization rate, would be substantially understaffed 
five years later in 2014. 

2) The average increase in demand for services, without commensurate increases 
in resources, will make it difficult to provide responsive mental health services. 
Counseling centers that have not been equipped to respond to this trend may have to 
reduce other critical services such as education and training of campus stakeholders, 
consultation services for faculty and staff, participation in research, treating students 
with less severe concerns, and the training of future mental health providers. 

3) These results suggest that institutions should evaluate funding decisions based on 
observed clinical demand (the number/rate of students seeking services) rather than 
historical patterns of utilization that may no longer be reliable. 

4) Counseling center utilization is likely to increase even when institutional enrollment 
decreases. 

5) The average relationship, across 93 institutions, between student change in enrollment 
and change in students served in the counseling center was l-to-5. In other words, 
between 2009-2010 and 2014-2015, a 1% increase in institutional enrollment was 
associated with a 5% increase in the number of students served in the counseling 
center. 



Counseling Center Resource 
Utilization by Students 

One way to inform allocation of resources within centers 
is to examine how counseling center services are being 
used. With this in mind, 2014-2015 data was examined to 
determine how resources are distributed among students 
seeking services. The following points describe how various 
types of counseling center appointments are utilized by 
students across participating centers in 2014-2015: 

• One (1) is the most common number of 
appointments per client/per year. 

• Clients averaged 5.86 appointments with a range 
of 1-1 17 appointments. 

• 20% of clients accounted for over 50% of all 
appointments. 

• 10% of clients accounted for 36% of all 
appointments, averaging 20.96 appointments. 

• 5% of clients accounted for 23% of all 
appointments, averaging 26.14 appointments. 

• 1% of clients accounted for 6.5% of all 
appointments, averaging 38.13 appointments. 

• 10 clients utilized a total of 878 appointments. 

Average Number of Attended Individual Sessions 

A common question among counseling centers is, “What 
is the average number of counseling sessions attended by 
clients?” To examine this question we reviewed the 2014- 
2015 appointment data for initial clinical evaluations and 
any individual counseling session: 

A. Total number of attended appointments (initial and 
individual counseling): 373,495 

B. Total number of clients who attended appointments in 
A: 79,331 

C. Average number of attended counseling sessions per 
client (A divided by B): 4.71 

This preliminary analysis, of actual appointment 
attendance data across 139 institutions and approximately 
370,000 appointments, indicates that clients attend 
slightly less than 5 sessions of individual counseling on 
average (including an intake, but excluding other types of 
appointments). 



Impact of "Threat to Self" History on 
Appointment Usage 

To explore whether the growing levels of non-suicidal 
self-injury (NSSI) and serious suicidal ideation (see MH 
Trends) are having a clinical impact on counseling centers, 
we compared the total number of appointments (of any 
attendance value) for clients who endorsed these indicators 
and those who did not using five years of combined 
appointment data from 2010 through 2015. 


Average number of appointments for clients with and without 
a history of "threat to self" thoughts and behaviors. 



Suicide Considered Suicide 

This graph illustrates that students with a history of “threat 
to self” thoughts or behaviors use an average of 27% more 
services than students who do not. 


9 



Standardized Data Set (SDS) 

The Standardized Data Set (SDS) is a set of standardized materials used by counseling centers during routine clinical 
practice. The SDS contains 8 major sections, which include demographic questions, background information, and 
instruments that collect information related to the treatment provided to students receiving services. These sections include: 


Demographics: 

Client Information 
Provider Data 
Center Information 
Participating Institutions 


Instruments: 

Clinician Index of Client Concerns 
Critical Incident Form 
Termination Form 
CCMFI Appointment Categories 


The following sections of this report summarize the SDS data collected in 2014-2015. Please note that five of the SDS sections are included within the 
2014-2015 data set.TheTermination Form was implemented July 2015 and will be included in next year's report. 


Clinician Index of Client Concerns (CLICC) 

The CLICC was designed by CCMH to capture and facilitate reporting on 
the most common presenting concerns of counseling center clients, as assessed 
by the clinician, at the point of “intake”, or equivalent appointment. The 
resulting data enable individual centers, and CCMH, to quickly and easily 
report on the most common client concerns in addition to supporting a wide 
variety of research. The CLICC includes 44 concerns and asks the clinician 
to (a) check all that apply and (b) to identify the ‘top concern of those 
selected. This dual approach captures the complexity of each client while also 
highlighting the ‘primary concern of each individual client. 



10 


CLICC - "Check all that apply" 

First, clinicians are asked to “check all that apply” for each client, such that one client can have many concurrent concerns. 

As a result, this chart illustrates how often each concern occurs across all clients, regardless of how many concerns a student 
had or what their top concern was (N=37,856). 

Concern 

Anxiety 
Stress 
Depression 
Family 

Relationship problem (specific) 

Academic performance 
Interpersonal functioning 
Self-esteem/confidence 
Sleep 

Adjustment to new environment 
Social isolation 
Eating/body image 
Mood instability 
Grief/loss 
Trauma 
Alcohol 
Career 

Identity development 
Suicidality 
Attention difficulties 
Perfectionism 
Anger management 
Sexual abuse/assault (victim) 

Health/medical 
Drugs 

Self-injurious thoughts or behaviors 
Financial 

Harassment/emotional abuse (victim) 

Obsessions or compulsions 
Other 

Physical abuse/assault (victim) 

Legal/judicial/conduct 
Racial, ethnic, or cultural concerns 
Sexual orientation 
Sexual concern 
Violent thoughts or behaviors towards others 
Religion/spirituality 
Gender identity 
Discrimination 
Addiction (not drugs or alcohol) 

Psychotic thoughts or behaviors 
Pregnancy related 
None 

Stalking (victim) 

0 10 20 30 40 50 60 

Percent 



11 


CLICC - "Top-most concern" 

For this question, clinicians are asked to choose one primary concern (i.e., the top-most concern) per client. As a result, 
clinicians are asked to choose one primary concern (i.e., the top concern) per client. As a result, this graph illustrates the 
frequency of each concern as the primary concern for clients (N=37,856). 


Concern 



i i i 

Anxiety 




Depression 

15.8% 

Relationship problem (specific) 

i 

9.4 

1 

4 


Stress 

5.9% 



Family 

4. 

>% 



Academic performance 

3.9% 




Interpersonal functioning 

3.8% 




Grief/loss 

3.6% 




Mood instability 

2.6% 




Adjustment to new environment 

2.6% 




Self-esteem/confidence 

2.5% 




Eating/body image 

2.1% 




Alcohol 

2.0% 




Other 

2.0% 




Trauma 

1.9% 




Suicidality 

1.8% 




Sexual abuse/assault (victim) 

1.7% 




Identity development 

1.4% 




Attention difficulties 

1.3% 




Career 

1.3% 




Anger management 

1.1% 




Legal/judicial/conduct 

1.0% 




Drugs 

0.9% 




Health/medical 

■ 0.8% 




Obsessions or compulsions 

0.7% 




Social isolation 

0.7% 




Self-injurious thoughts or behaviors 

■ 0.7% 




Perfectionism 

0.5% 




Harassment/emotional abuse (victim) 

1 0.4% 




Sleep 

0.4% 




Sexual orientation 

0.3% 




Physical abuse/assault (victim) 

0.3% 




None 

0.3% 




Sexual concern 

1 0.2% 




Gender identity 

0.2% 




Financial 

0.2% 




Psychotic thoughts or behaviors 

0.2% 




Addiction (not drugs or alcohol) 

0.2% 




Pregnancy related 

0.1% 




Violent thoughts or behaviors towards others 

0.1% 




Racial, ethnic, or cultural concerns 

0.1% 




Religion/spirituality 

0.1% 




Stalking (victim) 

0.0% 




Discrimination 

0.0% 





0 5 10 15 20 

Percent 


12 



Client Demographic Information 

The SDS contains a number of “core” or required items and a larger number of 
optional items that are typically asked of students seeking services. Because centers 
can ask different questions, the total number of responses vary by question. 


What is your gender identity?* 



n 

Percentage 

Woman 

53,028 

62.6 

Man 

30,676 

36.2 

Transgender 

292 

0.3 

Self-ldentify 

699 

0.8 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #88 


What was your sex at birth ? 



Overall (%) 
n=8,912 

Male (%) 
n= 2,939 

Female (%) 
n=5,845 

Transgender (%) 
n=34 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n=94 

Female 

66.4 

0.2 

99.7 

61.8 

66.0 

Male 

33.6 

99.8 

0.3 

38.2 

34.0 

Intersex 

0.0 

0.0 

0.0 

0.0 

0.0 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #90 


Do you consider yourself to be: 



Overall (%) 
n= 78,935 

Male (%) 
n=28,505 

Female (%) 
n=49,465 

Transgender (%) 
n = 283 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n = 682 

Heterosexual 

84.7 

86.3 

85.2 

16.6 

7.0 

Lesbian 

1.6 

0.0 

2.4 

8.1 

7.5 

Gay 

2.8 

7.3 

0.1 

6.0 

5.9 

Bisexual 

5.7 

3.2 

6.9 

19.4 

17.3 

Questioning 

2.3 

1.7 

2.5 

8.8 

9.1 

Self-ldentify 

3.0 

1.5 

2.9 

41.0 

53.2 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #91 


Since puberty, with whom have you had sexual experience(s)? 



Overall (%) 
n=7,711 

Male (%) 
n=2,377 

Female (%) 
n=5,237 

Transgender (%) 
n = 32 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n = 65 

Only with men 

49.3 

5.7 

69.9 

6.3 

9.2 

Mostly with men 

10.6 

3.7 

13.4 

9.4 

30.8 

About the same 
number of men and 

women 

2.2 

1.5 

2.2 

21.9 

10.8 

Mostly with women 

2.8 

5.3 

1.3 

25.0 

16.9 

Only with women 

22.8 

70.8 

1.2 

21.9 

10.8 

1 have not had sexual 
experiences 

12.3 

13.0 

11.8 

15.6 

21.5 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #93 


13 



People are different in their sexual attraction to other people. Which best describes your current 
feelings? Are you: 



Overall (%) 
n= 8,778 

Male (%) 
n= 2,843 

Female (%) 
n=5,832 

Transgender (%) 
n=33 

Self-ldentify (%) 
o=70 

Only attracted to 

women 

26.8 

78.7 

1.9 

12.1 

4.3 

Mostly attracted to 

women 

4.9 

8.7 

2.5 

45.5 

25.7 

Equally attracted to 
women and men 

4.4 

1.7 

5.1 

27.3 

40.0 

Mostly attracted to 

men 

13.9 

3.6 

18.9 

3.0 

17.1 

Only attracted to men 

48.2 

6.0 

69.6 

9.1 

4.3 

Not sure 

1.8 

1.2 

2.0 

3.0 

8.6 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #94 


What is your race/ethnicity? 



Overall (%) 
n=80,039 

Male (%) 
n= 29,072 

Female (%) 
o=50,016 

Transgender (%) 
o=278 

Self-ldentify (%) 
o=673 

African-American/ 

Black 

9.2 

7.5 

10.3 

6.5 

4.0 

American Indian or 
Alaskan Native 

Asian America n/Asian 

0.4 

.4 

0.3 

1.1 

.4 

6.9 

7.2 

6.8 

2.2 

3.7 

Hispanic/Latino/a 

7.6 

7.1 

8.0 

6.5 

5.8 

Native Hawaiian or 
Pacific Islander 

0.2 

0.2 

0.2 

0.4 

0.0 

Multiracial 

4.5 

4.0 

4.7 

8.6 

7.9 

White 

69.5 

71.5 

68.3 

72.3 

71.3 

Self-ldentify 

1.7 

2.1 

1.3 

2.5 

6.8 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #95 


14 


What is your country of origin? 


Country 

n 

Afghanistan 

87 

Aland Islands 

12 

Albania 

32 

Argentina 

48 

Armenia 

12 

Australia 

51 

Austria 

13 

Bahamas 

25 

Bangladesh 

99 

Belgium 

10 

Belize 

10 

Bolivia 

33 

Bosnia and 
Herzegovina 

31 

Brazil 

325 

Bulgaria 

26 

Cameroon 

23 

Canada 

303 

Chile 

52 

China 

1,086 

Colombia 

248 

Congo, The 
Democratic 
Republic of 
the 

10 

Costa Rica 

23 

Cuba 

101 


Country 

n 

Syrian Arab 
Republic 

22 

Taiwan 

99 

Tanzania 

United 

Republic of 

10 

Thailand 

37 

Trinidad and 
Tobago 

25 

Turkey 

110 

Uganda 

12 

Ukraine 

43 

United Arab 
Emirates 

18 

United 

Kingdom 

193 

United States 

69,443 

United 

States Minor 
Outlying 

Islands 

195 

Uruguay 

11 

Venezuela 

150 

Vietnam 

138 

Virgin Islands, 
U.S. 

26 

Yemen 

10 

Zimbabwe 

14 


Country 

n 

Oman 

13 

Pakistan 

139 

Palestinian 

Territory, 

Occupied 

17 

Panama 

35 

Paraguay 

18 

Peru 

124 

Philippines 

160 

Poland 

61 

Puerto Rico 

244 

Romania 

39 

Russian 

Federation 

116 

Rwanda 

12 

Saudi Arabia 

163 

Serbia 

18 

Sierra Leone 

10 

Singapore 

24 

Somalia 

17 

South Africa 

37 

Spain 

49 

Sri Lanka 

31 

Sudan 

21 

Sweden 

29 

Switzerland 

11 


Country 

n 

Czech 

Republic 

11 

Denmark 

12 

Dominican 

Republic 

93 

Ecuador 

83 

Egypt 

55 

El Salvador 

45 

Ethiopia 

47 

Finland 

10 

France 

67 

Germany 

169 

Ghana 

63 

Greece 

34 

Guatemala 

41 

Guinea 

13 

Guyana 

14 

Haiti 

100 

Honduras 

42 

Hong Kong 

39 

India 

821 

Indonesia 

50 

Iran, Islamic 
Republic of 

173 

Iraq 

36 

Ireland 

29 

Israel 

36 


Country 

n 

Italy 

83 

Jamaica 

107 

Japan 

117 

Jordan 

23 

Kenya 

39 

Korea, 
Democratic 
People's 
Republic of 

32 

Korea, 

Republic of 

416 

Kuwait 

30 

Lebanon 

34 

Liberia 

18 

Lithuania 

10 

Malaysia 

45 

Mexico 

402 

Moldova 
Republic of 

11 

Morocco 

15 

Myanmar 

11 

Nepal 

53 

Netherlands 

34 

New Zealand 

17 

Nicaragua 

24 

Nigeria 

132 

Norway 

24 


Countries with less than 10 individuals: 

Algeria 

Croatia 

Latvia 

Qatar 

American Samoa 

Cyprus 

Libyan Arab Jamahiriya 

Saint Helena 

Angola 

Djbouti 

Luxembourg 

Saint Kitts and Nevis 

Antigua and Barbuda 

Dominica 

Macao 

Saint Lucia 

Aruba 

Eritrea 

Macedonia, The Former 

Saint Vincent 

Azerbaijan Bahrain 

Estonia 

Yugoslav Republic of 

and the Grenadines 

Barbados 

Fiji 

Madagascar 

Senegal 

Belarus 

French Guiana 

Malawi 

Slovakia 

Benin 

Gabon 

Mali 

Slovenia 

Bermuda 

Gambia 

Malta 

Suriname 

Bhutan 

Georgia 

Marshall Islands 

Swaziland 

Botswana 

Grenada 

Martinique 

Tajikistan 

Burkina Faso 

Guam 

Mayotte 

Togo 

Burundi 

Guinea-Bissau 

Micronesia, Federated States of 

Tunisia 

Cambodia 

Hungary 

Mongolia Montenegro 

Turkmenistan 

Cape Verde 

Iceland 

Namibia 

Turks and Caicos Islands 

Cayman Islands 

Jersey 

Netherlands Antilles 

Uzbekistan 

Central African Republic 

Kazakhstan 

Niger 

Virgin Islands, British 

Chad 

Kyrgyzstan 

Northern Mariana Islands 

Western Sahara 

Congo 

Lao People's 

Papua New Guinea 

Zambia 

Cote d'Ivoire 

Democratic Republic 

Portugal 



This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #31 


15 


Are you an international student? 



Overall (%) 
n= 80,638 

Male (%) 
n= 29,039 

Female (%) 
n=50,654 

Transgender (%) 
n = 282 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n = 663 

Yes 

5.2 

6.4 

4.6 

1.1 

2.9 

No 

94.8 

93.6 

95.4 

98.9 

97.1 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #32 



Are you the first generation in your family to attend college? 



Overall (%) 
n=72,019 

Male (%) 
n= 25,833 

Female (%) 
n=45,311 

Transgender (%) 
n=261 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n=614 

Yes 

22.5 

20.8 

23.4 

24.9 

20.0 

No 

77.5 

79.2 

76.6 

75.1 

80.0 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #56 


Current academic status 



Overall (%) 
n=83,113 

Male (%) 
n= 30,099 

Female (%) 
n=52,055 

Transgender (%) 
n = 283 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n = 676 

Freshmen/first-year 

20.1 

19.9 

20.2 

24.4 

19.7 

Sophomore 

20.4 

20.0 

20.6 

19.8 

21.2 

Junior 

22.4 

22.4 

22.5 

23.7 

22.8 

Senior 

21.4 

22.2 

20.9 

18.0 

22.2 

Graduate/professional 
degree student 

14.1 

13.7 

14.3 

12.0 

11.5 

Non-student 

0.2 

0.3 

0.2 

0.0 

0.2 

High school student 
taking college classes 

0.0 

0.0 

0.0 

0.0 

0.0 

Non-degree student 

0.3 

0.3 

0.3 

0.4 

0.3 

Faculty or staff 

0.1 

0.1 

0.1 

0.0 

0.0 

Other 

1.0 

1.1 

0.9 

1.8 

2.2 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #37 


Graduate or professional degree program 



Overall (%) 
n=23,350 

Male (%) 
n=8,449 

Female (%) 
n=14,665 

Transgender (%) 
n = 67 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n=169 

Post-Baccalaureate 

11.0 

11.4 

10.9 

7.5 

4.7 

Masters 

14.5 

12.2 

15.8 

14.9 

12.4 

Doctoral degree 

8.0 

8.9 

7.5 

3.0 

10.1 

Law 

2.2 

2.7 

2.0 

1.5 

1.2 

Medical 

2.2 

1.7 

2.5 

0.0 

0.0 

Pharmacy 

0.4 

0.3 

0.5 

0.0 

1.2 

Dental 

0.1 

0.1 

0.2 

0.0 

0.0 

Veterinary Medicine 

0.6 

0.2 

0.8 

1.5 

0.0 

Not Applicable 

54.9 

56.5 

53.8 

65.7 

66.9 

Other 

6.1 

5.9 

6.2 

6.0 

3.6 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #39 


16 



What year are you in your graduate/professional program ? 



Overall (%) 
n=11,684 

Male (%) 
n=4,218 

Female (%) 
n=7,370 

Transgender (%) 
n = 23 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n= 73 

1 

35.4 

32.7 

36.8 

34.8 

50.7 

2 

24.8 

23.6 

25.5 

26.1 

16.4 

3 

15.0 

15.1 

14.9 

26.1 

11.0 

4 

17.4 

19.3 

16.4 

8.7 

11.0 

5+ 

7.4 

9.2 

6.3 

4.3 

11.0 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #41 


Did you transfer from another campus/institution to this school ? 



Overall (%) 
n=75,995 

Male (%) 
n=27,480 

Female (%) 
n= 47,646 

Transgender (%) 
n=250 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n=619 

Yes 

19.8 

21.0 

19.0 

24.0 

25.5 

No 

80.2 

79.0 

81.0 

76.0 

74.5 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #46 


What kind of housing do you currently have? 



Overall (%) 
n=65,332 

Male (%) 
n=23,417 

Female (%) 
n=41,138 

Transgender (%) 
n = 220 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n = 557 

On-campus residence 
hall/apartment 

38.4 

36.6 

39.3 

41.8 

40.4 

On/off campus 

fraternity/sorority 

house 

2.0 

2.4 

1.7 

0.9 

1.1 

On/off campus 
co-operative housing 

0.9 

1.0 

0.9 

1.4 

1.1 

Off-campus 

apartment/house 

57.3 

58.6 

56.9 

53.6 

55.8 

Other 

1.3 

1.4 

1.2 

2.3 

1.6 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #42 


With whom do you live? (check all that apply) 



Overall (%) 

Male (%) 

Female (%) 

Transgender (%) 

Self-ldentify (%) 

Alone 

9.8 

10.4 

9.4 

15.4 

13.4 

(n=8,298) 

(n=3,176) 

(n=4,983) 

(n=45) 

(n=94) 

Spouse, partner, or 

7.5 

6.7 

8.0 

11.6 

8.3 

significant other 

(n= 6,372) 

(n=2,053) 

(n=4,227) 

(n= 34) 

(n=58) 

Roommate(s) 

49.3 

48.0 

50.1 

41.1 

44.6 

(n=41,755) 

(n=14,739) 

(n=26,584) 

(n=120) 

(n=312) 

Children 

2.1 

1.6 

2.4 

1.7 

1.7 

(rt=1 ,751 ) 

(n=485) 

(n=1 ,249) 

(n=5) 

(n=12) 

Parent(s) or 

7.0 

6.8 

70 

11.6 

10.7 

guardian(s) 

(n= 5,907) 

(n= 2,082) 

(n=3,716) 

(n=34) 

(n= 75) 

Family other 

3.3 

3.3 

3.3 

4.5 

4.0 

(n= 2,829) 

(n=1 ,017) 

(n=1 ,771 ) 

(n=13) 

(n=28) 

Other 

1.1 

1.0 

1.1 

2.4 

2.3 

(n=910) 

(n=311 ) 

(n= 576) 

(n=7) 

(n=16) 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #44 


17 



Relationship status 



Overall (%) 
n= 80,677 

Male (%) 
n=29,198 

Female (%) 
77=50,526 

Transgender (%) 
n = 279 

Self-ldentify (%) 
77=674 

Single 

61.8 

67.3 

58.7 

59.5 

58.8 

Serious dating 
or committed 
relationship 

32.6 

27.2 

35.7 

36.6 

37.4 

Civil union, domestic 
partnership, or 
equivalent 

0.4 

0.3 

0.4 

0.7 

0.9 

Married 

4.1 

4.2 

4.1 

2.9 

1.9 

Divorced 

0.6 

0.5 

0.7 

0.0 

0.6 

Separated 

0.4 

0.5 

0.4 

0.4 

0.3 

Widowed 

0.0 

0.0 

0.1 

0.0 

0.1 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #33 


Mental Health History Items 


Attended counseling for mental health concerns 



Overall (%) 
0=76,060 

Male (%) 
n=27,357 

Female (%) 
n=47,793 

Transgender (%) 
n=273 

Self-ldentify (%) 
77=637 

Never 

51.3 

56.4 

48.9 

24.5 

24.0 

Prior to college 

19.4 

17.0 

20.6 

25.6 

25.7 

After starting college 

16.4 

16.1 

16.5 

19.8 

21.8 

Both 

13.0 

10.5 

14.0 

30.0 

28.4 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #1 


Taken a prescribed medication for mental health concerns 



Overall (%) 
/ 7 = 78,871 

Male (%) 
n=26,876 

Female (%) 
77=47,098 

Transgender (%) 
77=266 

Self-ldentify (%) 
77=631 

Never 

66.9 

69.0 

66.1 

48.5 

46.0 

Prior to college 

8.8 

8.7 

8.7 

11.3 

14.4 

After starting college 

13.1 

12.4 

13.3 

16.5 

19.3 

Both 

11.3 

9.8 

11.9 

23.7 

20.3 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #2 


NOTE: The following paired questions ask the student to identify "How many times" and "The last time" for 
each experience/event. Frequencies for "The last time" questions are based on students who reported having 
the experience one time or more. 

Been hospitalized for mental health concerns (how many times ) 



Overall (%) 
77=80,503 

Male (%) 
n= 28,960 

Female (%) 
77=50,578 

Transgender (%) 
77=285 

Self-ldentify (%) 
77=680 

Never 

89.8 

89.6 

90.0 

82.1 

81.5 

1 time 

6.6 

6.6 

6.6 

11.9 

12.1 

2-3 times 

2.8 

2.9 

2.6 

3.9 

4.7 

4-5 times 

0.5 

0.5 

0.4 

0.7 

0.7 

More than 5 times 

0.4 

0.4 

0.4 

1.4 

1.0 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #64 




Been hospitalized for mental health concerns (the last time) 



Overall (%) 
n= 7,865 

Male (%) 
n= 2,872 

Female (%) 
n=4,818 

Transgender (%) 
n = 50 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n=125 

Never 

1.2 

1.6 

0.9 

0.0 

0.0 

Within the last two 
weeks 

8.8 

9.3 

8.7 

2.0 

4.8 

Within the last month 

4.9 

5.4 

4.7 

6.0 

4.0 

Within the last year 

20.9 

20.3 

21.2 

18.0 

24.0 

Within the last 

1-5 years 

40.5 

38.9 

41.4 

52.0 

40.0 

More than 5 years ago 

23.7 

24.5 

23.1 

22.0 

27.2 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #65 


Purposely injured yourself without suicidal intent (e.g., cutting, hitting, burning, etc.) 
(how many times) 



Overall (%) 
n=80,321 

Male (%) 
n=28,874 

Female (%) 
n=50,489 

Transgender (%) 
n=281 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n = 677 

Never 

75.0 

83.3 

70.9 

41.6 

38.8 

1 time 

5.4 

4.7 

5.8 

6.8 

8.0 

2-3 times 

6.8 

5.2 

7.6 

10.7 

11.8 

4-5 times 

2.5 

1.5 

3.0 

5.3 

6.1 

More than 5 times 

10.3 

5.3 

12.6 

35.6 

35.3 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #72 


Purposely injured yourself without suicidal intent (e.g., cutting, hitting, burning, etc.) 
(the last time) 



Overall (%) 
n=1 6,927 

Male (%) 
n=4,045 

Female (%) 
n=1 2,367 

Transgender (%) 
n=148 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n = 367 

Never 

0.8 

1.0 

0.8 

0.0 

0.3 

Within the last two 
weeks 

14.0 

14.8 

13.6 

14.9 

16.1 

Within the last month 

8.4 

8.4 

8.3 

6.8 

12.5 

Within the last year 

21.1 

20.9 

21.1 

25.0 

22.3 

Within the last 

1-5 years 

33.0 

32.7 

33.1 

40.5 

32.4 

More than 5 years ago 

22.7 

22.2 

23.2 

12.8 

16.3 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #73 


Seriously considered attempting suicide (how many times) 



Overall (%) 
n= 80,333 

Male (%) 
n=28,895 

Female (%) 
n=50,476 

Transgender (%) 
n=281 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n=681 

Never 

67.1 

69.2 

66.5 

34.9 

31.6 

1 time 

11.9 

11.2 

12.3 

11.4 

13.5 

2-3 times 

11.7 

10.6 

12.0 

20.6 

25.6 

4-5 times 

2.5 

2.2 

2.5 

6.8 

7.0 

More than 5 times 

6.9 

6.9 

6.6 

26.3 

22.3 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #74 


19 



Seriously considered attempting suicide (the last time) 



Overall (%) 
0=21,413 

Male (%) 
n=7,146 

Female (%) 
o=1 3,688 

Transgender (%) 
n=167 

Self-ldentify (%) 
o=412 

Never 

0.8 

0.8 

0.8 

0.0 

1.2 

Within the last two 
weeks 

16.0 

18.8 

14.5 

15.6 

19.2 

Within the last month 

10.3 

11.1 

9.9 

7.2 

11.2 

Within the last year 

21.1 

21.2 

20.9 

22.8 

22.1 

Within the last 

1-5 years 

34.5 

31.8 

35.9 

40.1 

32.8 

More than 5 years ago 

17.3 

16.4 

17.9 

14.4 

13.6 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #75 


Made a suicide attempt (how many times) 



Overall (%) 
n=80,247 

Male (%) 
n=28,847 

Female (%) 
o=50,439 

Transgender (%) 
o= 283 

Self-ldentify (%) 
o= 678 

Never 

90.5 

92.1 

89.9 

69.3 

76.0 

1 time 

6.3 

5.3 

6.7 

16.6 

13.6 

2-3 times 

2.5 

2.1 

2.6 

10.6 

8.1 

4-5 times 

0.3 

0.3 

0.4 

1.1 

0.7 

More than 5 times 

0.4 

0.3 

0.4 

2.5 

1.6 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #76 


Made a suicide attempt (the last time) 



Overall (%) 
n=6,579 

Male (%) 
n=1,955 

Female (%) 
o=4,390 

Transgender (%) 
o=82 

Self-ldentify (%) 
o=152 

Never 

0.8 

1.1 

0.7 

0.0 

1.3 

Within the last two 
weeks 

5.5 

6.8 

5.1 

3.7 

2.6 

Within the last month 

3.3 

3.9 

3.1 

1.2 

2.6 

Within the last year 

15.9 

15.4 

16.0 

12.2 

17.8 

Within the last 

1-5 years 

43.1 

41.9 

43.2 

56.1 

46.7 

More than 5 years ago 

31.4 

30.7 

31.9 

26.8 

28.9 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #77 


Considered causing serious physical injury to another (how many times) 



Overall (%) 
n=80,218 

Male (%) 
n=28,841 

Female (%) 
o=50,418 

Transgender (%) 
o=283 

Self-ldentify (%) 
o=676 

Never 

89.2 

86.2 

91.0 

82.0 

79.4 

1 time 

3.4 

4.1 

3.0 

4.2 

5.8 

2-3 times 

3.8 

5.0 

3.1 

5.7 

6.1 

4-5 times 

0.8 

0.9 

0.7 

2.1 

1.2 

More than 5 times 

2.8 

3.7 

2.2 

6.0 

75 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #78 


20 



Considered causing serious physical injury to another ( the last time) 



Overall (%) 
n=6,629 

Male (%) 
n=3,062 

Female (%) 
n=3,5405 

Transgender (%) 
n=46 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n=116 

Never 

2.2 

2.4 

2.2 

0.0 

0.9 

Within the last two 
weeks 

19.2 

18.9 

19.8 

13.0 

16.4 

Within the last month 

11.4 

10.8 

12.0 

6.5 

12.1 

Within the last year 

23.8 

24.8 

23.0 

23.9 

21.6 

Within the last 

1-5 years 

29.2 

29.1 

29.0 

39.1 

31.9 

More than 5 years ago 

14.1 

14.1 

14.0 

17.4 

17.2 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #79 


Intentionally caused serious physical injury to another (how many times) 



Overall (%) 
n= 79,830 

Male (%) 
n= 28,737 

Female (%) 
n=50,136 

Transgender (%) 
n = 284 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n = 673 

Never 

96.9 

95.6 

97.7 

95.1 

95.2 

1 time 

1.6 

2.1 

1.3 

2.5 

2.2 

2-3 times 

1.0 

1.4 

0.7 

2.1 

1.5 

4-5 times 

0.2 

0.2 

0.1 

0.0 

0.6 

More than 5 times 

0.4 

0.7 

0.2 

0.4 

0.4 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #80 


Intentionally caused serious physical injury to another (the last time) 



Overall (%) 
n=1,797 

Male (%) 
n = 927 

Female (%) 
n=831 

Transgender (%) 
n=12 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n = 27 

Never 

2.8 

2.9 

2.9 

0.0 

0.0 

Within the last two 
weeks 

6.5 

4.5 

9.0 

0.0 

0.0 

Within the last month 

5.0 

4.4 

5.8 

0.0 

0.0 

Within the last year 

15.5 

14.7 

16.6 

0.0 

14.8 

Within the last 

1-5 years 

34.3 

35.4 

33.1 

50.0 

25.9 

More than 5 years ago 

35.9 

38.1 

32.6 

50.0 

59.3 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #81 


Someone had sexual contact with you without your consent (e.g., you were afraid to stop what 
was happening, passed out, drugged, drunk, incapacitated, asleep, threatened or physically 
forced) (how many times) 



Overall (%) 
n= 79,286 

Male (%) 
n=28,546 

Female (%) 
n=49,790 

Transgender (%) 
n = 282 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n=668 

Never 

80.0 

93.2 

72.8 

69.5 

57.5 

1 time 

11.3 

4.4 

15.1 

13.1 

17.5 

2-3 times 

5.5 

1.5 

7.7 

7.4 

15.3 

4-5 times 

0.9 

0.3 

1.2 

2.1 

2.2 

More than 5 times 

2.3 

0.7 

3.2 

7.8 

7.5 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #82 


21 



Someone had sexual contact with you without your consent (e.g., you were afraid to stop what 
was happening, passed out, drugged, drunk, incapacitated, asleep, threatened or physically 
forced) ( the last time) 



Overall (%) 
o= 12,767 

Male (%) 
n=1,570 

Female (%) 
o=1 0,863 

Transgender (%) 
n=81 

Self-ldentify (%) 
o= 253 

Never 

0.5 

1.0 

0.5 

0.0 

0.0 

Within the last two 
weeks 

3.7 

2.5 

3.9 

2.5 

2.4 

Within the last month 

3.7 

2.5 

4.0 

1.2 

2.0 

Within the last year 

19.9 

16.1 

20.5 

19.8 

18.2 

Within the last 

1-5 years 

38.7 

30.4 

39.8 

38.3 

45.8 

More than 5 years ago 

33.5 

47.6 

31.4 

38.3 

31.6 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #83 


Experienced harassing, controlling, and/or abusive behavior from another person (e.g., friend, 
family member, partner, or authority figure) (how many times) 



Overall (%) 
o=80,000 

Male (%) 
n=28,781 

Female (%) 
o= 50,263 

Transgender (%) 
o= 278 

Self-ldentify (%) 
o= 678 

Never 

66.7 

75.7 

62.1 

42.8 

33.9 

1 time 

6.9 

4.6 

8.2 

6.8 

8.3 

2-3 times 

7.3 

5.3 

8.4 

9.7 

12.1 

4-5 times 

2.0 

1.4 

2.4 

4.7 

2.2 

More than 5 times 

17.0 

13.0 

18.9 

36.0 

43.5 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #84 


Experienced harassing, controlling, and/or abusive behavior from another person (e.g., friend, 
family member, partner, or authority figure) (the last time) 



Overall (%) 
n= 20,762 

Male (%) 
n= 5,389 

Female (%) 
o=1 4,837 

Transgender (%) 
o=144 

Self-ldentify (%) 
o= 392 

Never 

0.9 

1.2 

0.8 

0.7 

0.0 

Within the last two 
weeks 

10.3 

10.5 

10.3 

9.0 

7.9 

Within the last month 

7.9 

7.7 

7.8 

13.9 

11.2 

Within the last year 

20.7 

18.7 

21.2 

25.0 

24.5 

Within the last 

1-5 years 

37.0 

30.5 

39.4 

32.6 

36.7 

More than 5 years ago 

23.3 

31.3 

20.5 

18.8 

19.6 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #85 


Experienced a traumatic event that caused you to feel intense fear, helplessness, or horror 
(how many times) 



Overall (%) 
n= 77,990 

Male (%) 
n=28,153 

Female (%) 
n=48,906 

Transgender (%) 
n=273 

Self-ldentify (%) 
o=658 

Never 

61.9 

67.7 

58.8 

51.3 

47.6 

1 time 

16.8 

14.1 

18.4 

13.9 

15.8 

2-3 times 

12.5 

10.7 

13.5 

15.4 

16.9 

4-5 times 

2.2 

1.9 

2.4 

2.9 

5.3 

More than 5 times 

6.5 

5.6 

6.8 

16.5 

14.4 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #86 


22 



Experienced a traumatic event that caused you to feel intense fear, helplessness, or horror 
(the last time) 



Overall (%) 
n= 22,591 

Male (%) 
n=6,849 

Female (%) 
#7=15,328 

Transgender (%) 
#7=116 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n = 298 

Never 

0.9 

1.1 

0.8 

0.0 

0.3 

Within the last two 
weeks 

11.3 

13.1 

10.5 

6.9 

10.1 

Within the last month 

7.3 

7.4 

7.3 

4.3 

6.0 

Within the last year 

22.6 

22.0 

22.8 

25.0 

21.5 

Within the last 

1-5 years 

34.9 

32.2 

36.1 

379 

33.9 

More than 5 years ago 

23.1 

24.1 

22.5 

25.9 

28.2 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #87 


Please select the traumatic event(s) you have experienced: 



Overall (%) 
n=1 6,01 3 

Male (%) 
n=4,558 

Female (%) 
#?=11,170 

Transgender (%) 
#7=76 

Self-ldentify (%) 
#7=209 

Childhood 
physical abuse 

18.8 

(n=3,004) 

20.6 
(n= 939) 

17.8 

(n=1,987) 

19.7 

(o=15) 

30.1 
(n= 63) 

Childhood 
sexual abuse 

16.1 

(f)=2,586) 

9.9 

(#7=451 ) 

18.6 

(n=2,076) 

17.1 

(#7=13) 

22.0 
(n= 46) 

Childhood 
emotional abuse 

44.3 

(n= 7,092) 

42.6 

(n=1,943) 

44.6 

(n=4,983) 

56.6 
(n= 43) 

58.9 

(n=123) 

Physical attack 
(e.g., mugged, beaten 
up, shot, stabbed, 
threatened with a 
weapon) 

15.2 

(n=2,433) 

23.3 

(n=1,060) 

11.8 

(n=1,316) 

21.1 

(o=16) 

19.6 

(o=41) 

Sexual violence 
(rape or attempted 
rape, sexually 
assaulted, stalked, 
abused by intimate 
partner, etc.) 

29.3 

(n=4,686) 

8.0 

(n= 364) 

377 

(n= 4,207) 

31.6 

(n=24) 

43.5 

(o=91) 

Military combat or 
war zone experience 

1.3 

(n=213) 

3.2 

(n= 48) 

0.5 

(n= 60) 

0.0 

(o=0) 

2.4 
( 0=5) 

Kidnapped or 
taken hostage 

1.1 

(#7=176) 

0.7 

(n= 33) 

1.3 

(o=142) 

0.0 

(0=0) 

0.5 

(0=1) 

Serious accident, fire, 
or explosion (e.g., 
an industrial, farm, 
car, plane, or boating 
accident) 

11.7 

(n=1,875) 

14.3 
(n=651 ) 

10.7 

(0=1,191) 

13.2 

(o=10) 

11.0 

(o=23) 

Terrorist attack 

0.9 

(n=138) 

1.5 

(n= 68) 

0.6 

(o=67) 

1.3 

(0=1) 

1.0 

(0=2) 

Near drowning 

10.2 

(n=1,630) 

14.9 
(n= 677) 

8.1 

(o=910) 

19.7 

(o=15) 

13.4 

(o=28) 

Diagnosed with life 
threatening illness 

4.2 

(n= 676) 

5.2 

(n=238) 

3.8 

(n=424) 

1.3 

(0=1) 

6.2 

(o=13) 

Natural disaster 
(e.g., flood, quake, 
hurricane, etc.) 

4.6 

(n=734) 

5.2 

(n= 239) 

4.3 

(o=481) 

1.3 

(0=1) 

6.2 

( o=13) 

Imprisonment or 
torture 

1.0 

(n=153) 

2.1 

(n=97) 

0.5 

( o=53) 

2.6 

(0=2) 

0.5 

(0=1) 

Animal attack 

3.7 

(n= 598) 

5.0 

(n= 229) 

3.2 

(o=357) 

2.6 

(0=2) 

4.8 

( o=10) 

Other (please specify) 

23.1 

(n=3,703) 

25.5 

(n=1,161) 

22.1 

(0=2,472) 

25.0 

(o=19) 

24.4 

(o=51) 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #99 

**The total N includes treatment seeking students who reported having experienced at least 1 trauma 
experience on the SDS Question #99. 


23 



Felt the need to reduce your alcohol or drug use (how many times) 



Overall (%) 
n=77,522 

Male (%) 
n=27,948 

Female (%) 
n=48,661 

Transgender (%) 
r?=271 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n=642 

Never 

72.8 

66.6 

76.3 

72.3 

69.2 

1 time 

10.2 

11.1 

9.6 

12.9 

10.9 

2-3 times 

10.1 

12.0 

9.0 

8.9 

12.9 

4-5 times 

1.8 

2.3 

1.6 

3.0 

2.2 

More than 5 times 

5.1 

8.0 

3.5 

3.0 

4.8 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #66 


Felt the need to reduce your alcohol or drug use (the last time) 



Overall (%) 
n=1 6,501 

Male (%) 
rt=7,271 

Female (%) 
n= 8,988 

Transgender (%) 
n = 65 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n=177 

Never 

1.4 

1.4 

1.5 

0.0 

1.1 

Within the last two 
weeks 

28.5 

32.0 

26.0 

13.8 

20.3 

Within the last month 

18.2 

17.9 

18.3 

18.5 

21.5 

Within the last year 

29.9 

29.0 

30.5 

30.8 

35.6 

Within the last 

1-5 years 

18.3 

16.4 

19.7 

32.3 

19.2 

More than 5 years ago 

3.6 

3.2 

4.0 

4.6 

2.3 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #67 


Others have expressed concern about your alcohol or drug use (how many times) 



Overall (%) 
n=77,385 

Male (%) 
n=27,880 

Female (%) 
n=48,587 

Transgender (%) 
n=274 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n=644 

Never 

82.6 

77.6 

85.5 

83.2 

80.9 

1 time 

7.3 

8.6 

6.6 

7.7 

8.4 

2-3 times 

6.1 

7.7 

5.3 

4.0 

5.3 

4-5 times 

1.2 

1.5 

0.9 

2.9 

1.6 

More than 5 times 

2.8 

4.6 

1.8 

2.2 

3.9 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #68 


Others have expressed concern about your alcohol or drug use (the last time) 



Overall (%) 
n=10,328 

Male (%) 
n=4,745 

Female (%) 
n=5,433 

Transgender (%) 
r?=44 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n=106 

Never 

1.4 

1.3 

1.5 

0.0 

1.9 

Within the last two 
weeks 

21.8 

23.2 

20.8 

15.9 

17.0 

Within the last month 

16.4 

16.9 

16.0 

9.1 

12.3 

Within the last year 

32.9 

32.4 

33.4 

31.8 

34.9 

Within the last 

1-5 years 

22.3 

21.6 

22.6 

31.8 

32.1 

More than 5 years ago 

5.2 

4.7 

5.7 

11.4 

1.9 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #69 


24 



Received treatment for alcohol or drug use (how many times) 



Overall (%) 
n= 79,350 

Male (%) 
n=28,491 

Female (%) 
n=49,906 

Transgender (%) 
n=281 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n = 672 

Never 

96.1 

93.9 

97.4 

96.8 

95.8 

1 time 

2.9 

4.3 

2.0 

1.4 

3.0 

2-3 times 

0.7 

1.3 

0.4 

0.4 

0.6 

4-5 times 

0.1 

0.1 

0.1 

0.0 

0.3 

More than 5 times 

0.2 

0.4 

0.1 

1.4 

0.3 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #70 


Received treatment for alcohol or drug use (the last time) 



Overall (%) 
n=2,405 

Male (%) 
n=1,346 

Female (%) 
n=1,029 

Transgender (%) 
n = 9 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n=21 

Never 

1.7 

1.8 

1.7 

0.0 

0.0 

Within the last two 
weeks 

9.4 

8.7 

10.5 

10.0 

4.8 

Within the last month 

7.6 

7.5 

8.0 

0.0 

0.0 

Within the last year 

26.8 

27.6 

26.2 

0.0 

19.0 

Within the last 

1-5 years 

38.9 

39.5 

37.1 

88.9 

66.7 

More than 5 years ago 

15.6 

15.0 

16.5 

11.1 

9.5 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #71 

Think back over the last two weeks. How many times have you had: five or more drinks* in a row 
(for males) OR four or more drinks* in a row (for females)? (*A drink is a bottle of beer, a glass of 
wine, a wine cooler, a shot glass of liquor, or a mixed drink.) 



Overall (%) 
n=64,904 

Male (%) 
n=22,766 

Female (%) 
n=41,332 

Transgender (%) 
n = 228 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n = 578 

None 

59.1 

53.7 

61.7 

77.2 

74.0 

Once 

17.2 

17.2 

17.4 

12.7 

12.5 

Twice 

11.2 

12.6 

10.4 

4.8 

6.1 

3 to 5 times 

9.6 

12.0 

8.4 

4.8 

5.2 

6 to 9 times 

2.0 

2.9 

1.5 

0.0 

1.6 

10 or more times 

1.0 

1.6 

0.6 

0.4 

0.7 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #19 


Think back over the last two weeks. How many times have you smoked marijuana? 



Overall (%) 
n=74,057 

Male (%) 
n=26,376 

Female (%) 
n=46,782 

Transgender (%) 
n = 262 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n = 637 

None 

79.3 

73.2 

82.9 

79.4 

76.6 

Once 

5.5 

6.1 

5.2 

8.4 

6.0 

Twice 

3.6 

4.3 

3.2 

3.1 

3.5 

3 to 5 times 

4.6 

6.1 

3.8 

3.1 

5.3 

6 to 9 times 

2.2 

3.2 

1.7 

1.5 

1.9 

10 or more times 

4.7 

7.2 

3.3 

4.6 

6.8 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #96 


25 



Please indicate how much you agree with the statement: "I get the emotional help and support 
I need from my family." 



Overall (%) 
n=48,407 

Male (%) 
n=1 6,739 

Female (%) 
o=3 1,094 

Transgender (%) 
r?=174 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n=40 0 

Strongly disagree 

10.5 

9.9 

10.7 

25.9 

20.3 

Somewhat disagree 

13.7 13.0 

14.0 

19.0 

23.5 

Neutral 

15.5 

17.3 

14.4 

17.2 

19.0 

Somewhat agree 

31.0 

29.9 

31.7 

24.7 

27.0 

Strongly agree 

29.2 

29.9 

29.2 

13.2 

10.3 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #22 


Please indicate how much you agree with the statement: "I get the emotional help and support 
I need from my social network (e.g., friends, acquaintances)." 



Overall (%) 
o=50,811 

Male (%) 
n=1 7,879 

Female (%) 
o=32,341 

Transgender (%) 
o=178 

Self-ldentify (%) 
o=413 

Strongly disagree 

8.5 

9.7 

7.8 

3.4 

7.7 

Somewhat disagree 

13.1 

14.4 

12.4 

10.7 

12.1 

Neutral 

19.2 

21.8 

17.8 

14.0 

17.2 

Somewhat agree 

37.4 

34.6 

39.0 

36.5 

40.0 

Strongly agree 

21.8 

19.4 

23.0 

35.4 

23.0 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #23 


Are you registered, with the office for disability services on this campus, as having a documented 
and diagnosed disability? 



Overall (%) 
n= 79,902 

Male (%) 
n= 28,698 

Female (%) 
o=50,255 

Transgender (%) 
o=278 

Self-ldentify (%) 
o=671 

Yes 

7.8 

8.4 

7.4 

12.2 

12.1 

No 

92.2 

91.6 

92.6 

87.8 

87.9 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #60 


26 



If you selected "Yes" for the previous question, please indicate which category of disability you 
are registered for (check all that apply): 



Overall (%) 

Male (%) 

Female (%) 

Transgender (%) 

Self-ldentify (%) 

Attention Deficit/ 
Hyperactivity 

Disorders 

44.3 

( 0=2,767) 

52.1 

(o=1,257) 

39.6 

(0=1,472) 

38.2 

(o=13) 

30.9 

(o=25) 

Deaf or 

Hard of Hearing 

2.7 

(o=1 69) 

2.6 

(o= 63) 

2.7 

(o=102) 

8.8 

(o=3) 

1.2 

(0=1) 

Learning Disorders 

24.9 

(o=1,558) 

24.9 

(o=600) 

25.1 

(o=934) 

23.5 

(0=8) 

19.8 

(o=16) 

Mobility Impairments 

3.5 

(n=216) 

2.8 

(n= 67) 

3.8 

( o=1 40) 

5.9 

(0=2) 

8.6 

(o=7) 

Neurological 

Disorders 

5.7 

(n=358) 

4.8 

(n=116) 

6.2 

(0=231) 

8.8 

(0=3) 

9.9 

(0=8) 

Physical/Health 

Related Disorders 

11.3 

(o=708) 

7.7 

(n=1 87) 

13.7 
( 0=508) 

2.9 

(0=1) 

14.8 

(0=12) 

Psychological 

Disorder/Condition 

23.2 

(o=1,448) 

18.9 
( 0=457) 

25.5 

(n=948) 

38.2 

(o=13) 

37.0 

(o=30) 

Visual Impairments 

2.7 

(o=1 69) 

2.8 

(n=67) 

2.7 

(o=100) 

0.0 

(o=0) 

2.5 

(0=2) 

Other 

12.7 
(o= 796) 

12.1 

(n= 293) 

13.0 

(n=484) 

14.7 

(o=5) 

17.3 

(o=14) 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #61 


Please indicate your level of involvement in organized extra-curricular activities (e.g., sports, 
clubs, student government, etc.) 



Overall (%) 
n= 43,221 

Male (%) 
0=15,142 

Female (%) 
n= 27,603 

Transgender (%) 
n=151 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n=325 

None 

29.2 

31.6 

27.9 

24.5 

27.1 

Occasional 

participation 

21.0 

22.7 

20.1 

25.8 

22.2 

One regularly 
attended activity 

19.7 

19.4 

19.9 

15.2 

23.7 

Two regularly 
attended activities 

16.5 

14.5 

17.6 

18.5 

18.8 

Three or more 
regularly attended 
activities 

13.5 

11.8 

14.5 

15.9 

8.3 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #48 


Do you participate on an athletic team that competes with other colleges or universities? 



Overall (%) 
n=70,131 

Male (%) 
0=25,289 

Female (%) 
n=44,000 

Transgender (%) 
n = 257 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n = 585 

Yes 

7.2 

8.6 

6.5 

3.9 

3.1 

No 

92.8 

91.4 

93.5 

96.1 

96.9 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #50 


27 




Religious or spiritual preference 



Overall (%) 
o=69,171 

Male (%) 
n=24,894 

Female (%) 
0=43,472 

Transgender (%) 
o=240 

Self-ldentify (%) 
o=565 

Agnostic 

12.9 

15.4 

11.3 

22.1 

21.9 

Atheist 

8.6 

11.9 

6.5 

22.1 

18.9 

Buddhist 

0.9 

0.9 

0.9 

1.7 

2.1 

Catholic 

17.6 

16.2 

18.7 

4.6 

3.0 

Christian 

31.9 

26.8 

35.2 

12.9 

8.5 

Hindu 

0.9 

1.0 

0.8 

0.0 

0.2 

Jewish 

2.7 

2.7 

2.8 

1.3 

2.1 

Muslim 

1.3 

1.7 

1.2 

0.4 

0.0 

No preference 

19.3 

19.5 

19.2 

18.8 

23.0 

Self-ldentify 

3.8 

3.9 

3.5 

16.3 

20.2 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #97 


To what extent does your religious or spiritual preference play an important role in your life? 



Overall (%) 
n=51,971 

Male (%) 
n=1 8,207 

Female (%) 
n=33, 120 

Transgender (%) 
o=195 

Self-ldentify (%) 
o=449 

Very important 

15.2 

12.6 

16.7 

7.7 

8.0 

Important 

23.5 

21.5 

24.6 

20.5 

21.4 

Neutral 

34.7 

35.5 

34.2 

33.8 

35.0 

Unimportant 

14.7 

16.0 

13.9 

19.5 

15.1 

Very unimportant 

12.0 

14.3 

10.6 

18.5 

20.5 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #36 


How would you describe your financial situation right now? 



Overall (%) 
o=60,653 

Male (%) 
n=21,326 

Female (%) 
o=38,571 

Transgender (%) 
o=229 

Self-ldentify (%) 
o=527 

Always stressful 

14.8 

12.5 

16.0 

19.2 

18.4 

Often stressful 

22.0 

20.4 

22.8 

27.1 

27.3 

Sometimes stressful 

35.3 

35.9 

35.0 

38.0 

36.1 

Rarely stressful 

20.1 

22.2 

19.1 

13.1 

14.2 

Never stressful 

7.7 

9.0 

7.1 

2.6 

4.0 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #57 


How would you describe your financial situation growing up? 



Overall (%) 
o=41,008 

Male (%) 
n=14,130 

Female (%) 
o=26,375 

Transgender (%) 
o=152 

Self-ldentify (%) 
o=351 

Always stressful 

10.6 

9.1 

11.4 

15.1 

14.2 

Often stressful 

15.3 

14.0 

15.9 

20.4 

18.2 

Sometimes stressful 

23.6 

22.6 

24.1 

25.7 

23.6 

Rarely stressful 

28.6 

30.3 

27.7 

25.0 

28.8 

Never stressful 

21.9 

24.0 

20.9 

13.8 

15.1 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #58 


28 



Are you a member of ROTC? 



Overall (%) 
n= 39,907 

Male (%) 
0=14,219 

Female (%) 
n=25,334 

Transgender (%) 
n=147 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n=307 

Yes 

0.7 

1.1 

0.5 

0.7 

0.3 

No 

99.3 

98.9 

99.5 

99.3 

99.7 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #51 


Have you ever served in any branch of the US military (active duty, veteran. National Guard or 
reserves)? 



Overall (%) 
n=80,827 

Male (%) 
n=29,147 

Female (%) 
n= 50,720 

Transgender (%) 
n = 285 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n=675 

Yes 

1.7 

3.1 

0.9 

2.5 

1.5 

No 

98.3 

96.9 

99.1 

97.5 

98.5 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #98 


Did your military experience include any traumatic or highly stressful experiences which 
continue to bother you ? 



Overall (%) 
n=1,232 

Male (%) 
o=807 

Female (%) 
n = 410 

Transgender (%) 
n = 5 

Self-ldentify (%) 
n=10 

Yes 

31.1 

33.7 

25.9 

40.0 

30.0 

No 

68.9 

66.3 

74.1 

60.0 

70.0 


This question is from the Standardized Data Set Question #53 


29 



Provider Data 

The Standardized Data Set includes some basic demographic information about providers at participating counseling 
centers. The 2014-2015 dataset represents over 2,771 unique providers. Answer totals vary by question since some 
counseling centers do not gather this data, or a counselor chose not to answer one or more questions. 


Gender 



n 

Percentage (%) 

Male 

263 

30.7 

Female 

590 

68.8 

Transgender 

2 

0.2 

Prefer not to answer 

2 

0.2 


Age 



Age 

(years) 

n 

Average Age 

43.1 

782 

Modal Age 

32 

35 


Highest Degree-Discipline (descending sort) 



Race/Ethnicity 



" 

Percentage (%) 

African-American/Black 

68 

8.0 

American Indian or Alaskan Native 

3 

0.4 

Asian American/Asian 

58 

6.9 

Caucasian/White 

619 

73.3 

Hispanic/Latino/a 

51 

6.0 

Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander 

0 

0.0 

Multi-racial 

29 

3.4 

Prefer not to answer 

5 

.6 

Other 

12 

1.4 


Are you licensed under your current degree? 


Yes 

n=596 72.0% 


No 

n=232 28.0% 


Highest Degree (descending sort) 



n 

Percentage (%) 

Doctor of Philosophy 

320 

37.6 

Master of Arts 

121 

14.2 

Doctor of Psychology 

110 

12.9 

Master of Science 

85 

10 

Master of Social Work 

80 

9.4 

Doctor of Medicine 

32 

3.8 

Bachelor of Arts 

30 

3.5 

Master of Education 

23 

2.7 

Doctor of Education 

13 

1.5 

Other 

12 

1.4 

Bachelor of Science 

12 

1.4 

Nursing (e.g. RN, RNR PNP) 

5 

0.6 

Education Specialist 

4 

0.5 

Doctor of Osteopathy 

3 

0.4 


Position Type: (descending sort) 



n 

Percentage (%) 

Professional Staff Member 

631 

73.9 

Pre-Doctoral Intern 

67 

7.8 

Doctoral LevelTrainee (not an intern) 

48 5.6 

Master's LevelTrainee 

39 

4.6 

Other 

37 

4.3 

Post-Doctoral Level (non-psychiatric) 

30 

3.5 

Psychiatric Resident 

2 

0.2 


30 


Center Information 

The information below describes the 139 colleges and universities that contributed data to the 2014-2015 CCMH data set. 


Does your counseling center currently have an APA accredited 
pre-doctoral training program? 



" 

Percentage (%) 

Yes 

42 

31.1 

No 

93 

68.9 


Is your counseling center currently accredited by IACS 
(International Association of Counseling Services)? 



n 

Percentage (%) 

Yes 

65 

48.1 

No 

70 

51.9 


Which services are integrated with your counseling center? 
(check all that apply) 



n 

Percentage (%) 

Career Services 

13 

9.6 

Disability Services 

7 

5.2 

Drug & AlcoholTreatment Program 

39 

28.9 

Employee Assistance Program 

2 

1.5 

Learning Services 

4 

3.0 

Health Services 

19 

14.1 

Testing Services 

21 

15.6 

Other 

13 

9.6 


\ 3 


What psychiatric services are provided by your center? 



n 

Percentage (%) 

None 

40 

29.9 

Part time, in house 

61 

45.5 

Full time, in house 

13 

9.7 

Part time, off campus consultant 

6 

4.5 

Other 

14 

10.4 


Does your center have an annual individual psychotherapy 
limit? 



n 

Percentage (%) 

Yes 

49 

36.6 

No 

85 

63.4 


If you answered "yes" to session limit, please enter your 
individual psychotherapy session limit* 



" 

Percentage (%) 

8 

2 

4.1 

10 

9 

18.4 

12 

20 

40.8 

14 

2 

4.1 

15 

6 

12.2 

16 

4 

8.2 

17 

1 

2.0 

18 

1 

2.0 

20 

3 

6.1 

24 

1 

2.0 


*No school that provided information entered less than 7 sessions 


Check each service for which you charge a standard fee (don't 
check services that are initially free-e.g., first 8 sessions) 



n 

Percentage (%) 

Intake 

2 

1.5 

Individual Counseling 

6 

4.4 

Group Counseling 

6 

4.4 

Psychiatric Evaluation 
(initial meeting) 

25 

18.5 

Psychiatric Follow-up 
(ongoing client) 

25 

18.5 

Formal Assessment: Psychological 

14 

10.4 

Formal Assessment: Career 

12 

8.9 

Formal Assessment: Disability 

5 

3.7 

Other 

17 

12.6 




31 


Institutional Data 

Data for the 2014-2015 CCMH data set has been contributed by 139 colleges and universities that hold membership with 
CCMH. Demographics for these institutions are listed below. 




Campus Characteristic 

n 

Percentage (%) 

Athletic Division 



None 

9 

6.8 

Division 1 

75 

56.8 

Division II 

22 

16.7 

Division III 

26 

19.7 

Grade Scale 



0-4 

132 

97.1 

1-5 

0 

0 

0-100 

2 

1.5 

Other 

2 

1.5 


CCMH Member Institutions 

1. Abilene Christian University 

2. Agnes Scott College 

3. American College of Greece 

4. American University 

5. Amherst College 

6. Anderson University 

7. Appalachian State University 

8. Arkansas State University 

9. Auburn University 

10. Auburn University, Montgomery 

11. Augustana College 

12. Aurora University 

13. Ball State University 

14. Barnard College 

15. Barry University 

16. Baylor University 

17. Binghamton University 

18. Boston College 


19. Bowling Green State University 

20. Brigham Young University 

21. Bucknell University 

22. Butler University 

23. Cabrini College 

24. California Maritime Academy 

25. California State Polytechnic 
University, Pomona 

26. California State University, 
Channel Islands 

27. California State University, Chico 

28. California State University, 
Fullerton 

29. California State University, 

Long Beach 

30. California State University, 
Sacramento 

31. California State University, 

San Bernardino 


32. California State University, 

San Marcos 

33. Calvin College 

34. Case Western Reserve University 

35. Central College 

36. Charleston Southern University 

37. Chesnut Hill College 

38. Claremont University Consortium 

39. Clayton State University 

40. Cleveland State University 

41. Cleveland State University, 
Counseling and Academic Success 
Clinic 

42. Coastal Carolina University 

43. Colby College 

44. Colgate University 

45. College of Charleston 

46. College of Saint Benedict | 

Saint John's University 


32 


47. College of Southern Nevada 

48. College of the Holy Cross 

49. College of William & Mary 

50. Collin County Community College 

51. Colorado Christian University 

52. Colorado State University, 

Fort Collins 

53. Columbia College, Chicago 

54. Columbia College, Missouri 

55. Columbus State University 

56. Connecticut College 

57. Converse College 

58. Culver-Stockton College 

59. CUNY College of Staten Island 

60. CUNY Hunter College 

61. Dartmouth College 

62. DePaul University 

63. Dickinson College 

64. Dominican University 

65. Drexel University 

66. Duke University 

67. East Carolina University 

68. East Carolina University, 

Student Health Services 

69. Eastern Illinois University 

70. Eastern Kentucky University 

71. Eastern Michigan University 

72. Eastern Washington University 

73. Edgewood College 

74. Elon University 

75. Emerson College 

76. Emmanuel College 

77. Emory & Henry College 

78. Emory University 

79. Fairfield University 

80. Ferris State University 

81. Florida Atlantic University 

82. Florida Gulf Coast University 

83. Florida International University 

84. Fordham University 

85. Fort Lewis College 

86. Franklin & Marshall College 

87. Fullerton College 

88. Gannon University 

89. George Mason University 

90. Georgia College and 
State University 

91. Georgia Institute ofTechnology 

92. Georgia Southern University 

93. Georgia State University 

94. Gordon College 

95. Grand Valley State University 

96. Hamilton College 

97. Hobart and William Smith Colleges 

98. Houghton College 

99. Husson University 

100. Idaho State University 

101. Illinois Institute ofTechnology 

102. Illinois State University 

103. Illinois Wesleyan University 

104. Iowa State University 

105. Ithaca College 

106. JewishTheology Seminary 

107. John Brown University 


108. Johnson &Wales University, 
Providence 

109. Keele University 

110. Kennesaw State University 

111. La Salle University 

112. Lafayette College 

113. Lamar University 

114. Lawrence University 

115. Lee University 

116. Lehigh University 

117. Lehman College 

118. Lewis Clark State College 

119. Lindsey Wilson College 

120. Louisiana State University, 

Baton Rouge 

121. Louisiana State University, 
Shreveport 

122. Loyola Marymount University 

123. Loyola University, Chicago 

124. Loyola University, New Orleans 

125. Lyon College 

126. Marquette University 

127. Marywood University 

128. Mercer University 

129. Metropolitan State University 
of Denver 

130. Miami University, Ohio 

131. Michigan State University 

132. MiddleTennessee State University 

133. Mississippi State University 

134. Montana State University, Bozeman 

135. Montclair State University 

136. New College of Florida 

137. New Mexico State University 

138. North Carolina State University 

139. North Central College 

140. North Dakota State University 

141. Northeastern Illinois University 

142. Northern Arizona University 

143. Northern Illinois University 

144. Northwestern University 

145. Ohio State University 

146. Ohio University 

147. Old Dominion University 

148. Oregon Institute ofTechnology 

149. Oregon State University 

150. Pace University 

151. Pace University, 

Westchester Campuses 

152. Penn State University 

153. Penn State University, CEDAR Clinic 

154. Pennsylvania College ofTechnology 

155. Pepperdine University 

156. Plymouth State University 

157. Prince George's Community 
College 

158. Purdue University, West Lafayette 

159. Quincy University 

160. Ramapo College of New Jersey 

161. Regis University 

162. Rhode Island College 

163. Rice University 

164. Richard Stockton College of 
New Jersey 

165. Ringling College of Art and Design 


166. Robert Morris University 

167. Rochester Institute ofTechnology 

168. Roger Williams University 

169. Rollins College 

170. Roosevelt University 

171. Rose-Hulman Institute of 
Technology 

172. Rutgers University, Camden 

173. Sacred Heart University 

174. Saddleback College 

175. Saint Joseph's University 

176. Saint Mary's College of California 

177. Saint Mary's College of Maryland 

178. Saint Norbert College 

179. Salem State University 

180. Salisbury University 

181. Sam Houston State University 

182. San Diego State University 

183. Santa Clara University 

184. Santa Rosa Junior College 

185. Savannah College of Art 
and Design 

186. Scranton University 

187. Seton Hall University 

188. Shenandoah University 

189. Simpson College 

190. Slippery Rock University 

191. South Dakota State University 

192. Southern Illinois University, 
Carbondale 

193. Southern Oregon University 

194. Spalding University 

195. Springfield College 

196. St. Cloud State University 

197. St. Edward's University 

198. St. John's University 

199. Stephen F. Austin State University 

200. Stetson University 

201. Stevenson University 

202. Suffolk University 

203. SUNY Albany 

204. SUNYBrockport 

205. SUNY Buffalo 

206. SUNY Cortland 

207. SUNY Geneseo 

208. SUNY Old Westbury 

209. SUNYOneonta 

210. SUNY Oswego 

211. Susquehanna University 

212. Syracuse University 

213. Tarleton State University 

214. Texas A&M University 

215. Texas A&M University, 
CentralTexas 

216. Texas A&M University, 

Corpus Christi 

217. Texas A&M University, West Texas 

218. Texas State University, San Marcos 

219. TexasTech University 

220. The University of Alaska, Fairbanks 

221. Towson University 

222. Truman State University 

223. Tulane University 

224. Union College 


33 



225. University at Buffalo 

226. University of Akron 

227. University of Alabama 

228. University of Alberta 

229. University of Arkansas, Fayetteville 

230. University of British Columbia 

231. University of California, Berkeley 

232. University of California, Davis 

233. University of California, Irvine 

234. University of California, 

Los Angeles 

235. University of California, Merced 

236. University of California, Riverside 

237. University of California, San Diego 

238. University of California, 

San Francisco 

239. University of California, 

Santa Barbara 

240. University of California, Santa Cruz 

241. University of Cambridge 

242. University of Central Florida 

243. University of Central Missouri 

244. University of Central Oklahoma 

245. University of Chicago 

246. University of Cincinnati 

247. University of Colorado, Boulder 

248. University of Colorado, Denver 

249. University of Connecticut 

250. University of Dayton 

251. University of Delaware 

252. University of Denver 

253. University of Florida 

254. University of Houston 

255. University of Houston, Clear Lake 

256. University of Idaho 

257. University of Illinois, Chicago 

258. University of Illinois, 

Urbana Champaign 

259. University of Iowa 

260. University of Kansas Medical 
Center, Kansas City 

261. University of Kentucky 

262. University of Maine 

263. University of Massachusetts, 
Boston 


264. University of Massachusetts, 
Dartmouth 

265. University of Massachusetts, Lowell 

266. University of Memphis 

267. University of Miami 

268. University of Michigan 

269. University of Michigan, Flint 

270. University of Missouri 

271. University of Missouri, Kansas City 

272. University of Nebraska, Kearney 

273. University of Nevada, Reno 

274. University of New Brunswick 

275. University of New Hampshire 

276. University of North Carolina, 

Chapel Hill 

277. University of North Carolina, 
Charlotte 

278. University of North Carolina, 
Greensboro 

279. University of North Carolina, 
Pembroke 

280. University of North Florida 

281. University of NorthTexas 

282. University of Northern Iowa 

283. University of Notre Dame 

284. University of Oregon 

285. University of Pennsylvania 

286. University of Richmond 

287. University of Saint Joseph 

288. University of San Francisco 

289. University of Sheffield 

290. University of South Carolina, 
Columbia 

291. University of South Florida, 

St. Petersburg 

292. University of South Florida, Tampa 

293. University of Southern Maine 

294. University of Southern Mississippi 

295. University ofTennessee, Knoxville 

296. University ofTexas, Arlington 

297. University ofTexas, Austin 

298. University ofTexas, Dallas 

299. University ofTexas, San Antonio 

300. University of the Sciences, 
Philadelphia 


301. University of the South 

302. University of Utah 

303. University of Washington, Seattle 

304. University of Washington, Tacoma 

305. University ofWaterloo 

306. University ofWest Florida 

307. University ofWest Georgia 

308. University ofWisconsin, Eau Claire 

309. University ofWisconsin, Madison 

310. University ofWisconsin, Parkside 

311. University of Wisconsin, Platteville 

312. University ofWisconsin, River Falls 

313. University ofWisconsin, Stout 

314. University of Wisconsin, 
Whitewater 

315. University ofWyoming 

316. Ursinus College 

317. Valparaiso University 

318. Vanderbilt University 

319. Virginia Commonwealth University 

320. Virginia Military Institute 

321. Virginia Polytechnic Institute 
and State University 

322. Wake Forest University 

323. Washington State University 

324. Washington State University, 
Vancouver 

325. Wayne State University 

326. Weber State University 

327. West Chester University 

328. WestVirginia University 

329. Western Carolina University 

330. Western Connecticut State 
University 

331. Western Illinois University 

332. Western Kentucky University 

333. Western New England University 

334. Western Washington University 

335. Winthrop University 

336. Wright State University 

337. Yeshiva University 


34 


35 



Contact Information 

Center for Collegiate Mental Health 
Penn State University 
501 Student Health Center 
University Park, PA 16802 

Phone: 814-865-1419 
Email: ccmh@psu.edu 
Web: ccmh.psu.edu 


rp PennState